OA Library

Two Oxfordshire Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries: Berinsfield and Didcot Thames Valley Landscapes Monograph No. 8

Boyle, Angela and Dodd, Anne and Miles, David and Barclay, Alistair and Booth, Paul and Bradley, Philippa and Cook, Jean and Crowfoot, E and Harke, H and Harman, M and Hines, J and Thomas, R and Wallis, J and Wilson, Bob and Nichols, Karen and Page, Wendy and Mudd, Andrew and Cameron, E and Hamilton-Dyer, S and Letts, John and Hughes, Paul and Jennings, David and Scott, Ian (1995) Two Oxfordshire Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries: Berinsfield and Didcot Thames Valley Landscapes Monograph No. 8. Project Report. Oxford Archaeological Unit.

[img] PDF
Cover.pdf

2MB
[img] PDF
Title page frontispiece and colophonp.pdf

1MB
[img] PDF
Preface.pdf

96kB
[img] PDF
Contents, Figures, Plates & Tables.pdf

972kB
[img] PDF
Berinsfield and Didcot Summaries.pdf

93kB
[img] PDF
Berinsfield & Didcot Acknowledgements, Editorial Note Berinsfield Post-Excavation History.pdf

176kB
[img] PDF
An Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Berinsfield Wally Corner_title_page.pdf

1MB
[img] PDF
Chapter 1 Introduction.pdf

10MB
[img] PDF
Chapter 2 Prehistoric & Roman Activity.pdf

5MB
[img] PDF
Chapter 3 The Grave Catalogue.pdf

4MB
[img] PDF
Chapter 4 Discussion of the Finds.pdf

29MB
[img] PDF
Chapter 5 Discussion.pdf

19MB
[img] PDF
Appendix 1 The Naming of Berinsfield.pdf

130kB
[img] PDF
Appendix 2 Social Status Analysis.pdf

29MB
[img] PDF
An Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Didcot Power Station_title_page.pdf

22kB
[img] PDF
Chapter 6 Introduction.pdf

4MB
[img] PDF
Chapter 7 Prehistoric and Roman Activity.pdf

614kB
[img] PDF
Chapter 8 The Catalogue of Graves.pdf

1MB
[img] PDF
Chapter 9 Discussion of the Finds.pdf

1MB
[img] PDF
Chapter 10 The Environmental Evidence.pdf

459kB
[img] PDF
Chapter 11 Discussion and Conclusions.pdf

981kB
[img] PDF
Appendix 1 Grave Concordance.pdf

790kB
[img] PDF
Bibliography.pdf

1MB
[img] PDF
Index.pdf

1MB

Abstract

Berinsfield Summary In August 1974 a watching brief was maintained at the Wally Corner gravel pit, Berinsfield, to observe and record a known cropmark complex during stripping for gravel extraction. Following the unexpected discovery of an Anglo-Saxon cemetery at the site, a three-week rescue excavation was carried out, supplemented by a further two weeks work in 1975. Excavation revealed a pit, interpreted as the remnants of a late Neolithic/early Bronze Age pond barrow, and a cremation in association with a Deverel-Rimbury vessel which may have been a satellite burial. In the Roman period, the site was part of a system of enclosures defined by ditches and gullies orientated on N-S and E-W axes, which was in use from the later 1st to the later 4th century AD. A thin scatter of pits and a well, datable to the Roman period, were also recovered. The pagan Anglo-Saxon cemetery consisted of 100 inhumation graves which contained 114 burials, and 4 cremations. The cemetery contained a mixed population of men, women and children and grave goods suggest that it was in use from the mid 5th century until the late 6th or early 7th century. The artefacts recovered were typical of early Saxon material culture of the Upper Thames valley. Inhumation graves were orientated on two predominant axes, S-N and W-E, and appear to have been aligned on the Roman ditch system. Analysis has suggested that the cemetery developed from multiple foci, and that burials were concentrated in distinct family or household groups. It is likely that a considerable proportion of the cemetery was removed by gravel quarrying before its existence was recognised, and the excavated burials may represent only a half to two thirds of its original extent. The archive and finds have been deposited with the Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford. Didcot Summary In May 1991 the OAU carried out an evaluation at Didcot Power Station, in advance of a proposed development by National Power. Following the discovery of a single grave, a three-week excavation took place. It uncovered prehistoric ditches and pits, Romano-British ditches and pits, two sunken featured buildings and a small Anglo-Saxon cemetery. The sunken featured buildings contained small quantities of pottery dating to the 6th century as well as a few 'typical' grave goods including a bone weaving pick. Environmental evidence included animal bones and charred plant remains. The cemetery comprised 17 inhumations consisting of men, women and children. The grave goods indicated that they were buried during the 7th century. It is likely that the cemetery extends beyond the area of the excavation and that the excavated examples therefore represent an unknown proportion of the total population. The archive and finds will be deposited with the Oxfordshire County Museum Service.

Item Type:Monograph (Project Report)
Subjects:Geographical Areas > English Counties > Oxfordshire
Period > UK Periods > Early Medieval 410 - 1066 AD
Period > UK Periods > Roman 43 - 410 AD
ID Code:5871
Deposited By: Scott
Deposited On:18 Nov 2020 12:28
Last Modified:18 Nov 2020 12:28

Repository Staff Only: item control page